Cooking Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef

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There are many ways to cook beef, the preferred methods for cooking Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef cuts are roasting, pan-frying, broiling and grilling.

Roasting is a dry heat cooking method which is often used for large, tender beef cuts. For specific tips on recipes, visit the roasting section of this Web site.

Pan-frying involves using high heat which is used to sear the meat, creating a flavorful crust. For specific tips on recipes, visit the pan-frying section of this Web site.

Broiling and grilling are very similar in that food is cooked directly with high heat. The difference between broiling and grilling is that broiling is usually done in an oven and the heat source is above the food, whereas, grilling is done on equipment that is generally used outdoors and the heat source is below the food. For specific tips and recipes for broiling or grilling visit the relevant section on this web site.

Keeping it Tender

  • Don't turn meat too often or use too low a heat as meat will stew and toughen without sealing in juices.
  • Test meat by pressing with blunt tongs; don't cut with a knife as juices will escape causing dryness.

How Do I know When my Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef is Cooked?

Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef can be served from rare to well-done, depending on your taste.

You can test for doneness by simply prodding the beef with your finger.  When it has a springy but firm texture and is moderately juicy, the beef is done. The firmer the feel of the meat, the more well-done it is. Rare will feel very soft, medium will feel a little firmer and well-done will feel very firm.

A meat thermometer is best for trying to determine the doneness of a roast. Insert the thermometer at the start of cooking, leaving it in throughout. When the estimated time is up, check the temperature.

Cook the Perfect Steak

Want to cook your steak perfectly?  Follow these guidelines for steak satisfaction:

Rare

Rare
  • Cook for a few minutes per side, depending on thickness.
  • Turn only once.
  • Cook until steak feels very soft with back of tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a rare steak as 113-122°F (45-50°C)
TIP: Provided you store and handle meat correctly, it is safe to eat whole pieces of meat (such as steaks and roasts) rare. If bacteria are present, they will only occur on the surface of meat, and are quickly destroyed by the heat of the pan or oven.

Medium Rare

Medium Rare
  • Cook on one side until moisture is just visible on the top surface.
  • Turn only once.
  • Cook on the other side until surface moisture is visible.
  • Steak will be cooked to medium rare when it feels soft with the back of the tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a medium rare steak as 131-140°F (55-60°C).

Medium

Medium
  • Cook on one side until moisture is pooling on top surface.
  • Turn once only.
  • Cook on second side until moisture is visible.
  • Steak will be cooked to medium when it feels springy with back of tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a medium steak as 140-149°F (60-65°C).

Medium Well

Medium Well
  • Cook on one side until moisture is pooling on top surface.
  • Turn and cook on second side until moisture is pooling on top.
  • Reduce heat slightly and continue to cook until steak feels firm with back of tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a medium-well steak as 150-157°F (66-69°C).

Well Done

Well Done
  • Cook on one side until moisture is pooling on top surface.
  • Turn and cook on second side until moisture is pooling on top.
  • Reduce heat slightly and continue to cook until steak feels very firm with back of tongs.
  • A meat thermometer will show the internal temperature of a well-done steak as 158-167°F (70-75°C).


Serving Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef

Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef should be rested for 5-10 minutes just prior to carving and serving to allow the juices to settle into the meat. The larger the piece of meat, the longer it rests. Even steaks should rest for a minute or so. Aluminum foil can be placed over the meat to hold in the heat.

Once the meat has rested, it can be served. Beef cuts such as roasts will require carving, and, to ensure beef is as tender as can be, it should be carved across the grain.

The grain refers to the direction in which the meat fiber runs. If you carve with the grain, the length of the fiber makes the slice of meat chewy. Carving across the grain shortens the length of the fiber, making it far more tender to eat.

Basic Tips for Carving a Beef Roast

  • For firmer, easier carving, allow roast to "rest" in a warm place for 5-10 minutes by removing the roast from the oven and covering it with foil.
  • Remove any strings or skewers as you carve.
  • Carve roast on a cutting board, not in a pan or on a platter.
  • To carve beef properly, use a sharp knife. Hold the carving knife at the same angle for each slice.
  • Use a slicing, not a sawing action, making use of the full length of the blade. 
  • Carve across the grain to ensure tenderness.
  • Tender cuts of beef can be cut into slices of any thickness; tougher cuts should be carved into thin slices.


Grilling Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef

There are two basic methods to grilling, and they involve direct and indirect heat.

Direct heat

Direct grilling means putting the food directly over the heat source — straight on the grill of your charcoal or gas grill. This method is ideal for steaks.

With direct heat, it's best to sear your meat quickly on both sides to start. After this, resist the urge to flip too often as this will dry your food. Instead, time your cooking and flip only once. The same goes for pricking your food — don't do it! You want to keep those juices in.

Indirect heat

With indirect grilling, the food is placed between the sources of heat which rotate inside the grill, much like a convection oven. This method is recommended for roasts.

There's no need to turn your food when using the indirect method as the heat will move around your grill and cook the food evenly on all sides.


Broiling Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef

Broiling is much like grilling in that food is cooked directly with high heat. The difference between broiling and grilling is that broiling is usually done in an oven and the heat source is above the food, whereas grilling is done on equipment that is generally used outdoors and the heat source is below the food.

Pan broiling is a quick and low-fat method used to cook thinner cuts of beef, especially tender steaks from the rib and the loin including the rib-eye, tenderloin, boneless NY striploin, Porterhouse, T-bone, and top sirloin, using dry heat.

Broiling Tips

  • Pan broiling requires only a small amount of good quality olive oil.
  • Lightly coat one side of the steak with olive oil.
  • Place in a preheated heavy skillet, oiled-side down.
  • Cook over medium heat until juices rise to the top of the uncooked surface.
  • Lightly coat the top of the uncooked surface with olive oil, then turn. Season the cooked side, if desired.
  • Continue cooking until beef reaches the desired degree of doneness.
  • Allow the Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef to rest for a couple of minutes before serving.


The Art of Roasting Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef

Roasting is one of the easiest and most delicious ways of preparing Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef. Roasting is a dry heat cooking method which is often used for large, tender beef cuts. The best cuts for roasting are obtained from the loin and the rib, however, there is a wide range of cuts suitable to roast. Choose either bone-in or boned cuts. Stuff them, marinate them, rub them with spices, or simply put them in the oven.

Roasting Tips

Follow these easy steps for the perfect roast:

  1. Heat oven to recommended temperature and weigh meat to estimate cooking time.

    Suggested Roasting Times per pound

     

    Oven Temp

    Rare

    Medium

    Well Done

    Beef roast cuts such as Rib, Rib Eye, Tri Tip, Tenderloin, and Sirloin

    390°F (200°C)

    15-20 minutes

    20-25 minutes

    25-30 minutes


  2. Place roast on a rack in a roasting pan. Pour a little water into the pan to stop juices burning in the pan during cooking.
  3. If you have a meat thermometer insert it into the thickest part of the roast. 
  4. Cook for estimated time, basting with pan juices throughout cooking. As the water evaporates, add more to the pan.
  5. Test to see if the roast is cooked to your liking by squeezing with tongs: rare feels soft; medium has a little resistance; well-done feels quite firm. It's best not to insert a skewer when testing to see if meat is done as it allows the juices, which keep meat tender and tasty, to escape.
  6. Alternatively, check the internal temperature of the roast on the meat thermometer. The roast is cooked to rare when the temperature reaches 115-125°F (45-50°C); medium when the temperature reaches 140-150°F (60-65°C); and well-done at 160-170°F (70-75°C).
  7. Remove roast from pan and cover loosely with foil. Allow to rest for about 5-10 minutes before carving. This allows the juices to settle. Well-rested meat won't lose any juices onto the plate.
  8. For the tenderest slices of meat, carve the roast across the grain. Holding the roast with tongs rather than a fork will prevent the juices escaping.


Experiment with Pan-Frying Nature’s Reserve™ Grass Fed Beef

Pan-frying is simple and offers Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef lovers the opportunity to experiment with many flavors and styles of cooking. From simply cooking a steak to creating stir-fries and pastas — all are possible using Nature’s Reserve Grass Fed Beef and a frypan.

Pan-frying and sautéing are similar except that a little more olive oil is used in pan-frying. High heat is used to sear the meat, creating a flavorful crust.

Pan-Frying Tips

  • The cuts of beef do not have to be thin, however, the cooking process may require more time
  • If you're preparing your own beef for stir-frying or pasta, cut it across the grain of the meat. Slicing across the grain gives a tender result
  • Prepare your ingredients before you heat your frypan
  • Cut all your ingredients into even-sized pieces so they all cook within the same time period
  • The olive oil should sizzle when the meat hits the pan: if it doesn't sizzle, the pan and oil are not hot enough
  • Steaks up to an inch thick are good candidates for pan-frying, either as a whole or in pieces
  • Steaks may be fried to any degree of doneness you like, but the internal temperature should reach 115°F (45°C)
  • A meat thermometer can check the internal temperature of a whole steak